Change is in the air . . .
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Transition to our new website!

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Roost 2006.25
One of a half dozen or more roost trees in the Loantaka bat family of roost trees. Nothing terribly remarkable, just 5 bats ultimately emerge from almost dead center of the view but on the left side of the trunk.

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House Bat Roost May 3
Largest colony of Indiana bats in NJ
Watch the chimney area carefully to see bats emerging from the siding trim. A clip of our "half a harp trap" method for sampling buildings is included. Watch for bats cleverly shifting around the trap on the left before emerging to avoid capture.

Project Video Clips

If video does not play, upgrade your Quicktime Player (just do it)

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Project Snapshots

Photos by John Chenger, Andy Pyle, and Kevin Rhome

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Participants and special thanks to:
Chelsea Albertson, John Chenger, Keith Christenson, Melissa Craddock, Lauren Florak, Kait Frantz, John Gumbs, Mitzi Gumbs, Matthew Hopkins, Bill Machauer, Andy Pyle, Kevin Rhome, Chris Sanders, Annette Scherer, Todd Sinander, Leslie Sturgess, and Jonathan Van de Venter

HopeHiberniatableTRoost Data Tables

Each morning surveyors check all transmittered bat roosts and verify exactly what tree or building is the choice of the day. Tables organize what kind of roost it is, how much it's been used, and evening emergence numbers, to name a few fields of interest.

HopeHiberniamap2TForaging Maps

Upon arrival to their summer grounds, Indiana bats would forage in what would become rather predictable patterns. We have data on core foraging areas of at least 6 different bats in late April.

HopeHiberniamapTMigration Routes

As bats were released, up to 6 mobile observers monitored the bat's action in order to have an idea of which direction the migration was heading. We have data on all 10 bats with observations lasting various lengths of time. One bat was completely followed on the ground to a roost tree almost 20 miles away.

The Indiana Bat (IBAT) is a federally endangered species documented in 1995, as well as in 1997, as inhabiting and utilizing woodland habitat and structures on Picatinny Arsenal (PICA) property. This mammal has also been documented as a hibernating bat species in three local mine sites near PICA, Morris County, NJ.

PICA’s Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) and Endangered Species Management Plan (ESMP) require dutiful conservation and protection of this animal under the Endangered Species Act. A major component of IBAT management is periodic surveys and monitoring of the local population, especially its summer use of available habitat on PICA or in the region.

PICA’s Natural Resources Manager in conjunction with Bat Conservation and Management Inc., the New Jersey Fish and Game, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Shaw Environmental Inc. have combined resources to design and implement an ambitious radio telemetry study of the IBATs as they emerge from local mines and migrate to summer roosts. Fieldwork for this project began April 12, 2006 and is expected to last until late May 2006.

This IBAT survey anticipates two distinct, yet interrelated efforts. The initial and main effort is an IBAT spring migration tracking survey. A second, follow-on project contingent upon the results of the spring effort, is a summer foraging tracking survey. The spring effort will entail trapping emerging female IBATs from local winter hibernacula; and track migration flights via telemetry methods to locate likely summer roosts (or sites), whether on or beyond PICA property. The minimum level of effort was to track 4 IBATS from one hibernaculm for as long as possible. BCM far exceeded project minimums by tracking 5 bats each from two different hibernaculms, essentially conducting two studies at once. Midway into the project it appears that the majority of bats are still located about 20 miles south of the hibernaculms.

Online resource
This web page intends to present preliminary general findings in the interest of rapidly sharing data between stakeholders and perhaps shed some light on day-to-day events occurring on the project.

There are also detailed migration, foraging, and roost maps available from a separate download page using a link below. A password will be required to obtain this higher level of detail, please inquire to jchenger "at" batmanagement.com if interested.

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2006 Mt. Hope-Hibernia Indiana Bat Migration Study

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Click Here to view slideshow or click on an image below

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Ummm, Be Free!

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Be Free!

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